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Purple and Violet Gems and associations

Believed   to be a very powerful colour by  religious  leaders,  purple  or  violet  can  take  the  attributes  of  red  and  blue  to  create  a  magical    colour  with  special  properties.  Linked  with  sensitivity  and  creativity,  it  has  always  been  popular with creative artists who like the sensual  properties  of  red,  combined  with  the  refined  calmness of blue. However, it can also display a  level of insecurity and lack of self-assurance, so  needs to be worn with confidence. 

There is much confusion about when to use the  word purple to describe a gem’s colour and when  to use violet. Firstly, the word violet is derived from that of a flower and purple from a creature  of the sea. Still confused? Violet is also the last  colour seen in a rainbow and has the shortest  wavelength  (380  to  420  nanometers)  beyond  which  are  invisible  ultraviolet  wavelengths.  More  confused?  Normally,  the  two  colour  descriptions  are  interchangeable,  but  many  in  the gem industry tend to use violet when the  colour has more blue tones and purple when the  colour has more red tones.

Historically,  when  the  colour  was  worn  by  a  man, it symbolised sober judgment and gravity;  when worn by a woman it demonstrated that she  was fond of religion. In ancient times the colour  was associated with Thursdays and the planet  Jupiter.

When it comes to the colour purple one gem  dominates:  Amethyst.  This  official  birthstone  of  February  can  often  demonstrate  some  of  the clearest, most vivid of all colours naturally  found  in  gems.  Because  the  colour  has  such  strong links with religion, for centuries, many  religious leaders including the pope have worn  Amethyst rings.

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Amethyst is probably the most well-known purple gemstone.