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Padparadscha Sapphire Gemstone

Padparadscha derives  its  name  from the Sinhalese word “padmaradschen”, which is the name of the colour used to describe the Sri  Lankan lotus flower. The reality however, is that the Lotus flower is a lot more pinkish than the gemstone.  Padparadscha  Sapphires  are  among  the rarest gems on the planet. They are strikingly beautiful and almost no other coloured gemstone compares to this unique mix of pink and orange. To be named a Padparadscha, the gem should exhibit both colours.

Hopefully soon there  will  be  something  more  concrete  I  can  offer  on  the  subject  of  “what really does qualify as a Padparadscha”.  For now, everyone in the trade seems to have  totally  different  views.  I  personally  follow  the thought that if you track the history of the  gem’s name and if you study some of the first  gems originating from Ceylon, then to be a true Padparadscha, a Sapphire should have a degree  of both orange and pink present under the same  lighting condition. The use of the Padparadscha  name when describing an orange Sapphire is a  hot topic in the gem industry. Some say it should  only  be  used  for  Sapphires  that  are  not  heat- treated; others say that it should only be used for  pinkish orange Sapphires actually mined in Sri  Lanka.

Also,  the  gem  world  seems  to  be  divided  on  whether Padparadscha should stand alone as a  gem name or whether it is used as a prefix to  Sapphire. Other countries that claim to produce Padparadscha  Sapphires  include  Vietnam, Tanzania and Madagascar.

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